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EU Banking Union in the Balance?

If it were needed, proof positive once again that politics and economics don’t always mix is this link to an article published today in the FT.  It discusses the split developing within the EU between Brussels, Paris and the European Central Bank (ECB) on one hand, and Germany on the other.  The subject of the split is the future direction of EU banking union, specifically the design of the Single Resolution Authority, which together with the Single Supervisory Mechanism and the Common Deposit Guarantee Scheme, represents the three pillars of EU banking union.

The article describes the “German vision” for banking union – one of gradual integration where Member States remain largely responsible for supervision (albeit with coordination between national authorities) and wholly liable for costs (so as to protect the German taxpayer).  This contrasts with the EU vision for banking union which demands the creation of a centralised “heavyweight bank executioner” and implies a surrender of sovereignty with which Germany is uncomfortable.

If one considers that a single EU authority is a necessary step in relation to the supervision of credit institutions from birth and throughout life, it seems logical to conclude that a single authority should also govern them in their death.  Despite this, apparently logic has no place in this discussion and no compromise is in sight.  Add to this the fact that reformers are up against the deadlines of looming elections in Germany and at an EU level as well as a change of commission and EU banking union seems to be as far away as ever.

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